Archive for the ‘ Liberty ’ Category

Keepers of Liberty

"The boys of the rising generation are to be the men of the next, and the sole guardians of the principles we deliver over to them." Th Jefferson in a letter to Samuel Knox, February 12, 1810

jefferson in coat

Our children today are the leaders tomorrow; how can they lead if we do not instill in them the principles of goodness and wisdom.  Education is most important, they must learn to read the wisdom of wise men, encouraged to ask wise questions in order for wise answers be found. Principles are based upon what is right and fair in the universe, what is give to us by birth, our children must know.

Allow children the follies of youth, give them time to experience freedom and liberty without reservations, to taste freedom and liberty gives one a desire for it for a lifetime. Let them frolic in days of youthful years; too soon they grow, yet while the young years mold them they need a happy heart.

Produce a good foundation in our children, allow them room for individual growth, but guide them where there are faults and praise them on achievements; a good adult shall appear. Take the time then as they grow, give them all necessary examples of principles with undeniable righteousness, they shall keep them close to rely their decisions on. Do not hesitate, be careful in securing news of their creator within their hearts, no man can be without a heart bathed in love, it gives him character, keeping him fair and balanced.

When upon your age, your days lingering in the autumn of your lifetime, give over to your children the business of guarding freedom and liberty; then too they shall prepare the next generation. Children are the holders of our existence, they are the keepers of freedom and liberty for the next generation; prepare them well and freedom and liberty shall prevail a millennium  hence.

Yours in Liberty

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A Recollection of Liberty

“I should, indeed, with peculiar delight, have met and exchanged there congratulations personally with the small band, the remnant of that host of worthies, who joined with us on that day, in the bold and doubtful election we were to make for our country, between submission or the sword; and to have enjoyed with them the consolatory fact, that our fellow citizens, after half a century of experience and prosperity, continue to approve the choice we made. May it be to the world, what I believe it will be, (to some parts sooner, to others later, but finally to all,) the signal of arousing men to burst the chains under which monkish ignorance and superstition had persuaded them to bind themselves, and to assume the blessings and security of self-government. That form which we have substituted, restores the free right to the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion. All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately, by the grace of God. These are grounds of hope for others. For ourselves, let the annual return of this day forever refresh our recollections of these rights, and an undiminished devotion to them.” Th Jefferson in his last letter June 24, 1826, to Rodger Weightman

Mr. Jefferson, I see even upon the approaching year marking a half century from the day of the greatest accomplishment upon this land, you had the highest hopes and dreams for the still fledgling nation. The breaking out of bondage, denouncing oppression; all you knew too well, and knew our creator gave us an ability far beyond just living under daily strive and slavish abuse.  Who gave to another man the right to control another, where did he get the license to do so; we know it not be true, and you dear sir dared to stand with your fellow delegates, declared independence, put your name below the very words you wrote. Give the King his notice, tell the world no longer would the British American colonies live under oppression, but would break from it, with a sword against their temples, colonists took to the fields of battle, and won.

I dare say, sir, no time in history since, have men united for a greater cause; we share your joy and honor given for your sacrifice. The approaching celebration, surely your recollections be golden, a time to ponder the part of life you left to America, giving it willingly to citizens when perhaps your enjoyment of life at Monticello be more appealing. Surely the years spent from it and your family took its toll upon you, but if you suffered America did not hear you; only the words you penned has survived and we do know the countless sacrifices made. But honored we are of what you gave, each fourth, every firework, flag and song, goes to your honor and to the other brave wise men you called your fellow countrymen. 

So here we shall be approaching the fourth of 2011, we must take this year for more than reflection, but we must hereby take a stand as great as yours with fear in our hearts. At long last, our nation has stumbled, men faltered and evil corruption slipped in; for a few generations, corruption has grown, our government no longer of the people but of the government and we shake in our shoes in fear of oppression. This day approaches and many wise men know full well there is no choice, we learned well our lessons of 1776, do not take revolution lightly but do so with facts of grievances firmly in your grip, walk steady and with conviction with your principles; and dear sir we have, no other choice but oppression faces us. To this day, our minds be made, the ink dried words, affirming our ReDeclaration of Independence. Please bless our work ahead, if I may ask of your permission, kindly watch over us as we save Liberty for another nine generations hence.

Yours In Liberty